Knowing the Symptoms for Diabetes

Are you wondering if you have diabetes? Most of the time, early symptoms have to do with glucose level – if your glucose level is higher than average, you may be at risk for diabetes. Diet and lifestyle also play a role in your diabetes risk factors. The word “glucose” refers to your blood sugar. Warning signs range from mild to severe. Sometimes, they’re so mild that they go unnoticed.

Knowing the Symptoms for Diabetes

There are some similarities when it comes to symptoms of both types of diabetes. Common symptoms include the following:

  • Fatigue and Hunger: As you eat, the body converts the food you consume into glucose, which the cells then use for energy. In order to bring the glucose to the cells, your cells need insulin. When your body doesn’t make enough insulin or when your cells resist the type of insulin your body makes, the glucose can’t give energy to the cells. This makes diabetics feel tired and hungry.
  • Excessive Thirst and Urination: On average, most people have to urinate between four and seven times per day. However, people who suffer from diabetes tend to urinate much more often. This is because the body isn’t able to absorb all of the glucose that passes through the kidneys. It tries to rid the body of the extra glucose by making extra urine, which is also why you feel thirstier than normal when you have diabetes.
  • Itchy Skin and Dry Mouth: Since your body is busy using the fluids you drink to make urine, there’s less moisture available for other things, like your skin and mouth. It’s easy to get dehydrated when you have diabetes. When your skin dries out, it becomes itchy.
  • Blurry Vision: As the fluid levels in your body change, the lenses in your eyes can swell up. As the lenses change shape, they are no longer able to focus properly, resulting in blurred vision. Loss of vision is already a concern when it comes to senior health and it’s amplified in people with diabetes.

Type 2 Diabetes comes with notably mild warning signs. Often, people don’t notice the symptoms at all. It’s not uncommon for someone to find out they’ve been living with Type 2 Diabetes for quite some time. By the time they learn about their health condition, it’s possible that the disease already caused long-term damage. Type 1 Diabetes, on the other hand, comes with symptoms that are noticeable and that happen quickly, in just a few days or a few weeks. The symptoms are much more severe than those of Type 2 Diabetes.